Switzer, Stephen 1682-1745

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Switzer had an English background having been born in Hampshire. In his books he implied that he was a "gentleman who through misfortune, had turned his hand to gardening" (Hadfield, p. 182).

Switzer obtained his experience under London and Wise. He designed gardens particularly in North England and possibly in Scotland. He edited a magazine entitled, The Practical Husbandrman and Planter.

He had a nursery garden and stand in central London. Hadfield reports that he conducted a campaign against Scottish gardeners who were coming in increasing numbers to England and therefore were competing with English nurserymen.

Among his works were Icnographia Rustica or The Nobleman, Gentleman, and Gardeners' Recreation (1715), The Practical Fruit Gardener (1724), and The Practical Kitchen Gardener (1727).

Switzer made plans for various gardens and was an exponent of what have been called "irregular" gardens as opposed to its established type of formal gardens still popular at that time in England.